Cats; magic fur balls malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology who have been worshipped since the dawn of time. princessdippy

Now, Gomez isn’t a particularly spoilt cat, or is he? Aren’t all cats spoilt? They get to sleep all day (usually on our beds or a pile of fresh washing) and they are fed on demand, literally. I will get screamed at and my head jumped on malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology in the early hours of the morning until I fall malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology out of bed and stumble down the stairs with one malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology eye open just to put some biscuits in his bowl. Once he’s satisfied his dawn binge he’ll come up to bed and go back to sleep malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology or sit in the window and chirp at things he malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology can see outside (a noisy trait typical of Bengal cats).

For over 3,000 years cats were represented socially and religiously. Many Egyptian deities were depicted with the head of a malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology cat (or in the company of one) and they represented power, justice, and fertility. Due to their skill in killing venomous snakes, cats were used for protecting the pharaoh and their protective malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology function is even mentioned in the Book of the Dead, a cat represents Ra and the sun, along with all the benefits it brings.

The first known cat-headed deity in Egypt was Mafdet. During the First Dynasty (2920-2770 BC) she was protector of the pharaoh’s chamber and tasked with warding off snakes, scorpions, and evil in general. During the Fourth and Fifth Dynasties (mid-30 th Century BC) the lion-headed goddess, Bastet was protector; her image and name can be found in royal tombs malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology of the time. We also have an indication of cats being domesticated and malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology tamed by way of a wall painting from the Fifth malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology Dynasty showing a cat wearing a collar, we also see the image of a cat sitting under malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology a dining chair from a banquet scene dating to 14 malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology th and 15 th Century BC.

Mummifying cats was common practice and some tombs contained up malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology to 17 tiny mummies, complete with vessels thought to contain milk for them to malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology enjoy in the afterlife. The earliest evidence we have of a cat being mummified malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology is that of Bojangle Fluffyface, the beloved pet cat of Prince Thutmose whose remains were malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology found in an elaborately carved limestone sarcophagus dating to c.1350 BC.

Over in India, their two great literary epics, The Mahabharata and The Ramayana both mention cats. One story involves a cat and a mouse who both malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology escape death and then discuss relationships, especially those unevenly balanced in strength and power. The other tale is of the god Indra who disguises malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology himself as a cat in order to escape discovery by malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology the husband of a beautiful maid he had just seduced. Cats were also kept as pets and similar to Egypt malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology and Mesopotamia the motive behind this was to utilise their malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology pest control skills and for their services they were held malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology in high regard and respected throughout the land.

In Persia it is claimed that the cat was created malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology by magic. There is a beautiful story that tells us of the malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology great Persian hero Rustum who saved a magician from a malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology band of thieves. To recover from the ordeal Rustum and the magician sat malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology next to a fire under the stars and the magician malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology asked Rustum what would he wish for in return for malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology saving his life? The hero said that he had everything he needed and malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology that the warmth of the fire, the scent of the smoke, and the beauty of the stars above was enough for malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology him. The magician took a handful of smoke, added flame, and plucked two of the brightest stars from the sky, holding them together he breathed life into them. When he opened his hands, the warrior saw a smoke-grey kitten with eyes as bright as the stars. This was the first Persian cat.

It is also said that the distinctive M pattern on malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology the forehead of all tabby cats was made when the malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology prophet Muhammed blessed his favourite cat. The same cat, called Meuzza, also features in another story where Muhammed was called to malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology prayer, but not wanting to disturb his sleeping feline who was malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology lying on his arm, he cut the sleeve off his robe and left her malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology in peace. This further cemented the cat’s position in relation to divine figures.

In Chinese mythology the story goes that in the beginning malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology cats were entrusted by the gods to look after and malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology oversee the world, they were also given the power of speech. Not surprisingly, the cats were more interested in playing with the falling malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology cherry blossom and taking long naps, they weren’t arsed with boring stuff like governing a planet! The cats explained to the gods, when they visited for their third spot-check, that they didn’t want to do this any more and nominated humans malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology instead. The god s agreed and transferred speech over to humans, but left the cats with diminished responsibility; they were to maintain order and keep time. It was thought that you could tell the time by malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology looking into a cat’s eyes. Nine times out of ten the answer is feeding time.

In Japan the ‘Beckoning Cat’ image represents the goddess of mercy. You know those lucky cats which wave at you from malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology every window in every Chinese shop and restaurant, they’re actually Japanese in origin. The story goes that a cat, sitting outside the temple of Gotoku-ji, raised her paw in acknowledgement of the emperor as he malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology passed by. Upon seeing this pleasant little wave, he entered the temple and seconds later a bolt of malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology lightning struck the road outside; the same spot where the emperor would have been stood malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology had the cat not beckoned him in. The cat was thus granted full honour and upheld as malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology a symbol of luck.

It is believed that cats were brought to Europe by malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology Phoenician traders coming from Egypt. Seeing as the Phoenicians traded extensively and with every known malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology civilisation at the time, it is fair to see how cats could have been malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology spread throughout such a large region. If this is true, which is likely, they may have also brought with them the connection between malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology cats and the Greek goddess Hecate. Even though Hecate was more commonly associated with dogs, there is one myth which connects her to cats also. The story goes that Zeus, not surprisingly, seduced a maid servant called Alcmene. Livid, Hera (Zeus’ wife) tried to kill Alcmene, but was unsuccessful so instead she transformed her into a malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology cat and banished her to the underworld where she would malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology forever serve Hecate. This story was popularised by the Roman writer Antonius Leberalis malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology in the 2 nd Century AD in his Metamorphosis tales. Distribution of his story through from the 9 th to malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology 16 th Century spread the myth and cemented the connection malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology between cats, darkness, the underworld, witchcraft, and transformation; an unfortunate popularity for cats.

The Catholic church (again) twisted the association between cats and magic and in their malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology deep-rooted habit of demonising important pagan symbols (which pre-dated their religion by millennia of history) branded the cat as a personification of the Devil and malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology an instrument of evil. This took a nasty turn when Pope Gregory IX denounced malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology cats as evil and in league with Satan (Vox in Roma 1233) this resulted in cats, more particularly black cats, being killed across Europe.

However, we could theorise that cats did get their post-mortem revenge in 1348 when an over thriving rodent population malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology facilitated the distribution of Bubonic Plague. A theory easily disputed as the plague was passed via malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology human interaction and not through human-rodent social relations, but it’s still nice to think the cats gained some revenge malignant fibrous histiocytoma radiology for their unfair persecution.

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